Fiona Broome ~ How Shakespeare changed everything


Yay Shakespeare and Faeries! A fun post amidst all of the intensities.

My name’s origin comes from Titania, so you might say I have a wee bit of a magickal connection to the Fae. And having been to Ireland, I have literally skipped with the Faeries and immersed in the “lore of the Fae” as Fiona Broome shares.

Thank you Laura (my Faery sister) and Fiona for such a light and mischievous-evoking post.

Laura Bruno's Blog

Shakespeare’s plays changed almost everything that we think about faeries.

Before Shakespeare wrote about them, most people were terrified of faeries.  One of the most frightening was a faerie called Robin Goodfellow.  He was blamed for bad luck, poor harvests, and even death.

Then, Shakespeare suggested that faeries might not be evil… just mischievous.

During Shakespeare’s era, that was a radical idea.

Shakespeare 1Shakespeare’s influences

In the 16th century, our modern-day ideas of faeries were born in Shakespeare’s plays.

His most famous faerie play is A Midsummer Night’s Dream. That story included human-sized faeries such as Titania and Oberon, and lesser spirits–including tiny ones–who served them.

One of the leading characters is Puck, who—as Robin Goodfellow—had an evil reputation before this play.

However, in Act 2, Scene One, a character called “Fairy” asks Puck if he is

“…that shrewd and knavish sprite
Called Robin…

View original post 448 more words

About Tania Marie's Blog

Creating life as a work of art with a magick rabbit by my side. I remember my song. Do you? Artist, Author and Reiki Master Teacher with over 25 years' experience in creative healing arts and metaphysical studies. Tania inspires people globally to return to natural harmony, draw forth imagination to manifest dreams, embody creative empowerment, and live more magickally and abundantly from their most natural frequency – in essence, Tania helps you to remember your song.

Posted on November 19, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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