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Exploring, Unveiling & Rebirthing in the Lake Louise & Banff Area


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Last week was one I will not forget. Some major energetic shifts, literal timeline jumps, and bigger picture energetics unfolded that were life changing and potent indeed. The details are far too involved and likely too challenging to convey for understanding and I’m not feeling guided to go into sharing at this time. However, I will share nature’s beauty that was surrounding us during our week in the Lake Louise and Banff areas to focus on the magick and mystery so richly around and available to navigate, yet not for the faint of heart and soul.

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I will say that since being in Canada I’ve felt a big energetic shift in general and in the very touristy, packed areas of Banff and Lake Louise I sense energy dynamics that were not once there in years previous, but creating quite a vortex of energy to navigate through with utmost conscious, heightened awareness.

I continue to find myself drawn into experiences and traversing where healing, harmonizing, and balancing energies are desired by the sacred land and collective. And I will say that that path is not an easy one to be on and embracing it has me walking fine lines and slipping through veils, not to mention encountering and working with challenging energies and forces.

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Here is a generalized summary of where we explored, for anyone who may feel called to visit the area, or who wants to know what they’re looking at, interspersed with photos from the week.

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First day: Bow Lake and Glacier Falls Hike where an amazing magickal rainbow greeted us. A sign and affirmation that all would unfold divinely, regardless of how it seemed.

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Second day: Lunch and errands in Banff at Nourish Bistro (an all vegan and vegetarrian restaurant), followed by grocery stocking up at Nester’s Market (Nestor was strongly by my side) and checking out the Banff gondola, and returning near our campground to hike around Moraine Lake.

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Third day: Lunch at Indian Curry House in Banff (delicious!) before kayaking from Banff Falls to Canmore on the Bow River, which had been delayed the previous day, ending up falling on the Leo New Moon of this day. Did 10 miles on it then hiked 4 and a half on this portal day of potent and transformative unfoldings. My friend Janet and a new friend of hers, Anna, had just arrived that evening, picked us up, and we had dinner together in Lake Louise Village. Saw an osprey and our first great blue heron in a long time on the river this day.

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Fourth day: Took it easy, rested, painted, took care of things at home, then made our way to Lake Louise seeing some deer, caught some orbs for the first time around the front of the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise, then hiked around Lake Louise seeing beautiful white seagulls on the aqua glacial water, as well as golden-mantled ground squirrel.

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Fifth day: More painting, then picked up Janet and Anna from their hike nearby leaving them at Moraine Lake Lodge to rest while we hiked to Consolation Lakes and connected with a hoary marmot. We returned to the lodge for refreshments and snacks and made plans to meet up with Janet and Anna again later at the Upper Banff Hot Springs for a relaxing soak after another visit to Nester’s Market. We saw a large black bear running along the edge of the forest on our way there.

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Sixth day: Janet and Anna left to head back to my friend Hillary’s ranch where they are working and we took the Lake Louise Gondola up the mountain to see the stunning views while hiking around a bit. I found some raw quartz at the top of the mountain and golden eagle sighting. Upon returning to our Lake Louise Campground we took a walk along the Bow River – the same we had kayaked down, which runs along the campground and is just across the way from our site.

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Seventh day:  Packed a picnic lunch and drove out toward the icefields. We missed the turn and ended up on the other highway, which aligned us in perfect time for sightings. It took us to the spiral tunnels where we perfectly timed seeing a massively long train (longest I’ve ever seen) go through them, then as we turned back to our car, on the right of the highway we came across a second black bear. Then as we neared our destination of Bow Summit Lookout Trail we came upon two grizzlies, one of which was still there on the way back after the hike. We stopped to connect more, as they munched on berries coming about 15 feet from the car, just completely absorbed in filling their bellies on berry delicacies so we were able to peacefully tune in with them. On the hike another marmot was hanging out taking in the view with us overlooking the stunning vista of Peyto Lake and Glacier. And another golden-mantled ground squirrel said hello. There were tons of amazing mushrooms on this hike of many varieties.

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Eight day: On our last day of transitioning from Banff National Park to Jasper National Park, we stopped at the Columbia Icefield where we were surrounded by glaciers galore and beautiful vistas of this glacial zone. We stopped and had lunch in the rv overlooking the glaciers and took in the sights, as well as stopped in at the Glacier Discovery Center. We didn’t take any of the helicopter or adventure rides out on the glacier, nor did we do the skywalk, which is further down the highway, as there were so many people and we’d already experienced this in a much more intimate way in Alaska, so just being in the energy and seeing these glaciers was powerful enough. I did manage to get a photo of the Glacier Adventure vehicle out on the glacier though.

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Our 5+ hour journey from Banff National Park to Jasper National Park took us through this vista, which to me symbolized, most literally, the veils that were crossed during the week’s experiences and the new realities of potential manifesting through the journey as I continue embracing more of my essence including my inner mountain goat.

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If you’d like a look at the animals I mentioned seeing during this week, please visit:

Animal Medicine Encounters

We are now at our new home at the gateway to Jasper National Park and the energy has shifted and continues integrating into more clarity and balance. There are changes with our journey upcoming and with things for me personally too, but still working that out right now. Just listening to the messages and going where the energy is guiding.

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Conscious Merging with Wildlife on the Trans-Canada Highway


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Yesterday we traveled on the Trans-Canada Highway to our home for the next full week in Edgewater, British Columbia just minutes from Kootenay National Park and Radium Hot Springs. Journeying this route provided opportunity to see the amazing wildlife crossing structures and fencing implemented here since 1996 on nearly 51 miles of highway, which is the longest on-going research and monitoring program of this nature in the world. It was such an incredible reflection of more conscious awareness and compassion for how our choices affect the whole.

I wasn’t aware of this project until Dave told me about it and that we’d be seeing it on our drive, although always wondered with all of my travels why no measures are taken other than lowering speed limits to help wildlife that we’ve taken land and migration patterns away from with our roads and building.

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We both loved this and I snapped some photos of the fencing and one overpass we crossed under which was cool to see since there are only 6 of these. We also journeyed over a few tunnel underpasses of which there are 38 of these.

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I love that this came about not just thinking of how expanding from two lanes to four on the highway could benefit people traveling it, but that simultaneously they thought of how to minimize effects on surrounding wildlife and to curb the high rate of wildlife mortality and wildlife-vehicle collisions.

I feel this collective way of looking at things and how our choices will affect the greater whole, which includes all of life, is so refreshing and one we will continue to see with shifts we are moving more into.

While disrupting the animals in general isn’t such a great thing in my opinion since we are taking away their normal migration patterns and routes creating dangers they didn’t once have to face, at least it’s refreshing to see more thought put into helping them and living more harmoniously with less impact.

Everything is, and is in, an evolution.

But I do love seeing more conscious awareness about how to find better ways to live in harmony with all of life.

This conscious highway was a result of scientists and transportation planners looking into ways to create a better situation and they made it top priority to continue to monitor and track animal movement.

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The solution they came up with includes nearly 8 foot tall sturdy, quality fencing along both sides of the highway, and wildlife under and overpasses to connect the vital habitats by allowing crossing access.

The overpasses are quite cool, as they’ve been created to match the landscape around with trees, grasses, and vegetation to make a natural bridge for them.These are also designed so that the animals can’t see the highway when crossing.

Each individual overpass cost over a million dollars each.

Now that’s compassionate investing.

Motion sensitive cameras are set up to monitor the success of these implementations and to track the effects it is having.

You can read 10 quick facts about the highway wildlife crossings at the link below, which includes this one that deserves big yay’s:

“Highway fencing in Banff National Park has reduced wildlife-vehicle collisions by more than 80% and, for elk and deer alone by more than 96%.”

Here’s the link:

10 Quick Facts About The Highway Wildlife Crossings in Banff National Park

The drive was gorgeous and infused more hope and belief in the compassion within humanity to try to find ways to return things to greater balance and harmony.

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We did actually see one deer inside the edge of the fencing and I smiled knowing she was safe.

I also was feeling back in my energetic flow merging with nature abound after leaving the big city and had gratitude for this more conscious merging I saw around me in reflection.

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