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The Gift of Color Vision


As a visionary artist, I have always been passionately obsessed with color and when I paint, I am always exploring and playing with vibrant combinations that you don’t always see, but are the way I “feel” them to be.

I may not have “tetrachomacy” like this article shares about, but my inner vision seems to be similar to how this rare eye condition provides the ability to see hues that aren’t visible to everyone.

This is a very cool article and I love how Concetta Antico is harnessing her rare gift to help colorblind people by sharing ways to retrain the brain to support color perception in her art classes that she teaches.

Outside The Lines

There is a rare condition that’s not fatal, but many artists would kill to have it. It is called tetrachomacy. Its main symptom is near-superhuman vision.

Impressionist painter Concetta Antico has tetrachomacy. When she examines a leaf, she sees a “mosaic of color,” not just shades of green.

“Around the edge I’ll see orange or red or purple in the shadow; you might see dark green but I’ll see violet, turquoise, blue,” she says. In her line of work, this ‘disorder’ is a rare gift that produces extraordinary works of art.

Tetrachromats have more receptors in their eyes to absorb color, letting them see hues that are invisible to everyone else. The average person has three cones, or photoreceptor cells in the retina that control color vision and allow people to see up to a million colors. Tetrachromats have four cones, so they can detect nuances and dimensions of color…

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